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Filaments modeled after Earth’s fastest falcon

April 22nd, 2017|Categories: Additive Manufacturing, Energy Efficiency, Engineering|Sectors: , , , , |

Filaments modeled after Earth's fastest falcon

The peregrine falcon is delivering some “real innovation and benefits” to aeronautics researchers in England, where they’re copying the bird’s feathers to 3D print filaments that mimic its ability to sense airflow changes, according to this 3D Printing Industry article. It could help create safer, more aerodynamic, and fuel efficient airplanes.

Curated by Janine Benyus

‘Seedkit’ helps plant biomimicry inspiration for cities of the future

March 18th, 2017|Categories: Architecture, Planning, Policy, Structures, Water|Sectors: , , |

'Seedkit' helps plant biomimicry inspiration for cities of the future

It’s a remarkable (and 100% achievable!) vision: Imagining how nature’s genius can help transform design and create sustainable cities of the future. A new toolkit from Urban Greenprint is exploring how employing biomimicry can manage waterflow, drawing from strategies found in the rainy Pacific Northwest. The wonderfully-named Seedkit allows users to easily explore an awesome set of water management ideas–all inspired by nature.

Curated by Jenna Cederberg

New technology could help us emulate nature’s brilliant shapes

February 4th, 2017|Categories: Additive Manufacturing, Architecture, Carbon, Energy Efficiency, Engineering, Materials, Product Design, Structures, Textiles, Water|Sectors: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

New technology could help us emulate nature’s brilliant shapes

The key to many of nature’s strategies is using shape rather than material. Emulating those shapes, especially at the nano-scale, has proven challenging. This new platform technology has the potential to leverage the shape of nature’s surface textures to add functionality to a wide variety of surfaces by building from the bottom up.

Dayna-01Curated by Dayna Baumeister

Preventing barnacle buildup by mimicking human skin

October 30th, 2016|Categories: Materials, Product Design|Sectors: |

Preventing barnacle buildup by mimicking human skin

The toxic solutions sailors have used for decades to help stop barnacle buildup on ship hulls may be on the way out thanks to a nontoxic, nature-inspired replacement. The new hydrogel that stretches like the human skin system. This New Atlas article details the approach that mimics skin’s ability to stretch, stay strong, and resist drying out.

Janine-01Curated by Janine Benyus

Looking to insect societies to increase infrastructure efficiencies

October 15th, 2016|Categories: Life's Principles, Resilience|Sectors: , , , |

Looking to insect societies to increase infrastructure efficiencies

Modern infrastructures, such as power grids, are becoming decentralized and self-organized. For example, more and more houses are equipped with solar panels, and heating systems self-adjust to local conditions. In insect societies, resilience emerges as a result of the collective behaviors of individuals. according to this Journal of Royal Society Interface article. Transportation networks, supply chains, and communication networks can benefit from studying how insects deal with disaster and disruption.

Robyn-01Curated by Robyn Klein

Bees inspire more efficient route planning

August 27th, 2016|Categories: Carbon, Planning|Sectors: , |

Bees inspire more efficient route planning

Bees are among the most masterful and most efficient routemakers of the Animal Kingdom, so it make sense that one entrepreneur looked to bees to create a new software system that can help delivery companies do what they do better. According to this Fast Co. article, Routific has developed an algorithm based on bees’ navigation methods, and it’s set to help companies from UPS to a local flower delivery shops save time, money, and cut emissions.

Jenna-01Curated by Jenna Cederberg

What is mold mapped our roadway routes?

August 5th, 2016|Categories: Engineering|Sectors: , |

What is mold mapped our roadway routes?

The incredibly crafty and ultra efficient way certain mold finds pathways to food could help redefine how humans set transportation routes. According to this Guardian article, “many-headed mold” can be studied to help map better routes. Scientists used salt as a detractor and oat flakes as an attractant to study how the mold would best get from place to place most effective throughout England.

Jenna-01Curated by Jenna Cederberg

Hummingbirds provide new way of looking at navigation

July 24th, 2016|Categories: Product Design|Sectors: , , , , |

Hummingbirds provide new way of looking at navigation

Another amazing adaptations from the wonderful hummingbird has been discovered by scientists, according to this New Scientist article. The “collision avoidance system” built into their brains could help us understand how to engineer better navigation systems, that allow vehicles and aircraft to go faster without crashing–just like a hummingbird.

Janine-01Curated by Janine Benyus

Investigating slime mold navigation methods

June 19th, 2016|Categories: Materials, Organizations, Planning|Sectors: , , |

Investigating slime mold navigation methods

Have you ever heard of intelligent slime? That is exactly what researchers at New Jersey Institute of Technology are uncovering with regard to slime mold– they are unpackaging the mechanisms behind how slime mold is able to “decide” how to navigate towards a food source. Fascinating!

Erin-01Curated by Erin Rovalo

Flows and structures inspired by nature

June 2nd, 2016|Categories: Architecture, Energy Efficiency, Life's Principles, Organizations, Structures, Water|Sectors: , , , , |

Flows and structures inspired by nature

In this interview with National Geographic, Adrian Bejan discusses his new book “The Physics of Life: The Evolution of Everything.” He comments on Constructal Law, how nature tends to optimize for flow, and wonders why there aren’t more designers using these time-tested principles!

Erin-01Curated by Erin Rovalo