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Could ecosystems as economies help Bitcoin go mainstream?

March 25th, 2017|Categories: Business Models|Sectors: , , , , |

Could ecosystems as economies help Bitcoin go mainstream?

Optimizing informational processes. Nature does it in many ways, and according to this The CoinTelegraph article, Bitcoin needs to as well. The authors highlight similarities between economies and ecosystems, and pose the question about how strategies borrowed from nature might just be what Bitcoin needs to solve its scaling challenges.

Curated by Janine Benyus

Engineering, biomimicry fusion creates pavilion that grows

March 23rd, 2017|Categories: Architecture, Engineering, Life's Principles, Materials, Product Design, Structures|Sectors: , , , , |

Engineering, biomimicry fusion creates pavilion that grows

The Elytra Filament Pavilion is now displaying in Germany. The pavilion, inspired by the hexagonal structures in beetle wings, is woven by a robot. This Inhabitat article mentions that real-time sensing data directs how the pavilion grows, opening the door for new thinking on how robots and engineering can help our designs evolve (as well as meet other Life’s Principles that seem incongruent with the built design).

Curated by Jamie Dwyer

DNA may hold key to building super computers of the future

March 10th, 2017|Categories: Product Design|Sectors: , , , , |

DNA may hold key to building super computers of the future

One of the most complex, essential, and amazing components of life that holds the key to genetic codes throughout nature, DNA is now being touted as a key to building faster and more efficient computers. This Edgy Labs article details research to mimic DNA’s self-replicating properties to create a computer system that grow as it computes. Looking to nature could create “exponentially” faster computers.

Curated by Janine Benyus

Bacteria hitch on a ride on the fungal highway

February 11th, 2017|Categories: Engineering, Materials, Structures|Sectors: , , |

Bacteria hitch on a ride on the fungal highway

The thin layer of water covering the surface of fungal filaments acts as a high speed rail for bacteria. Vast mycelium networks that knit the roots of different plants together in forest soils allow bacteria to jump the dry gaps, according to this Scientific American article. Where might these principles give rise to new innovations in drug delivery, chemical manufacturing, or perhaps the next generation of computing “hardware”?

Mark-01Curated by Mark Dorfman

Dolphins help solve tricky design challenge

February 10th, 2017|Categories: Materials, Product Design, Structures|Sectors: , , , |

Dolphins help solve tricky design challenge

The challenge: Design a micro, hyper-efficient laptop fan. The solution? In this case, computer manufacturing company Lenovo turned to one of our favorite sea mammals, the dolphin. By designing the fan to mimic the shape and design of a dolphin body, they were able to solve a sticky problem and create a high-performance fan for their laptops. Learn more in this Great Big Story video.

Jenna-01Curated by Jenna Cederberg

Cybersecurity software performs like human immune system

September 11th, 2016|Categories: Resilience|Sectors: , , |

Cybersecurity software performs like human immune system

How can companies combat cybersecurity threats get more and more advanced each day? Turn to one of nature’s most advance systems, the human immune system. That’s what the UK-based Darktrace did with its immunity approach system, which according to this Fast Co. article, which trains itself to find abnormalities rather than recognize malware.

Janine-01Curated by Janine Benyus

Processing and storing info, like neurons do

August 18th, 2016|Categories: Energy Efficiency, Materials, Structures|Sectors: , , , |

Processing and storing info, like neurons do

Researchers developed a device that imitates the functionality of neurons for storing and processing data at high speeds using very little energy. Rather than storing information digitally as 0 or 1, these devices use the phase change of a material between an “amorphous” and a crystalline state, according to this Science Daily article. The artificial neurons have been shown to sustain billions of switching cycles.

Mark-01Curated by Mark Dorfman

3D printing butterfly wing structures

June 26th, 2016|Categories: Engineering, Product Design|Sectors: , , |

3D printing butterfly wing structures

This article from 3DPrint.com details how scientists in Australia are using the power of 3D printing to employ innovation inspired by nature. In this case, 3D printing has helped them incorporate nanostructuring that mimics butterfly wings into electronic parts, which could create more durable and lightweight devices.

Janine-01Curated by Janine Benyus

Nature adaptations that go way behind the sixth sense

June 17th, 2016|Categories: Engineering, Product Design, Wellness|Sectors: , , |

Nature adaptations that go way behind the sixth sense

This Wired article highlights a set of amazing “sixth senses” animals have that, as Wired says, “you don’t.” Some have already been mimicked to create things like antimicrobial hospital surfaces, others may have huge innovation potential.

Jenna-01Curated by Jenna Cederberg

Butterfly wings inspire better optical communications

June 5th, 2016|Categories: Energy Efficiency|Sectors: , , , |

Butterfly wings inspire better optical communications

Green hairstreak butterfly wings amplify green colors due to a repeating pattern of spiral-shaped curls. Researchers replicated this gyroid nanostructureto create a more controlled material, according to this Science News article. Suggested applications include optics and photonics in the visible or near-ultraviolet wavelength region, which could increase the bandwidth of optical communications.

Robyn-01Curated by Robyn Klein