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Molecular movement of plants reveal amazing mechanics

April 20th, 2017|Categories: Engineering, Materials, Structures|Sectors: , , |

Molecular movement of plants reveal amazing mechanics

While members of the plant kingdom may appear to move only when acted upon by an outside force, time lapse photography of twisting vines, unfurling flowers, or popping seed pods betrays the programed movement of plants. Underlying such dynamics are the juxtaposition of clockwise and counterclockwise “twisted” molecules. According to this My Paper article, scientists in Europe have begun to mimic this principle with exciting potential applications in robotics, medicine, and more.

Curated by Mark Dorfman

Innovation Edges in Biomimetic Chemistry

April 11th, 2017|Categories: Infographic, Materials|Sectors: , , , , , , |

Innovation Edges in Biomimetic Chemistry

During his Synapse webinar, Cutting Edge Green Chemistry, Biomimicry 3.8’s Mark Dorfman outlined seven exciting threads of research in bioinspired chemistry that will drive innovations in the chemical and materials manufacturing sectors. Now, we’ve turned that into an infographic as a quick and easy reference to jump start thinking on applying these exciting research findings.

Curated by Mark Dorfman

Cutting Edge Green Chemistry

March 30th, 2017|Categories: Materials, Webinar|Sectors: , , , , , , |

To access this content, you must purchase Cutting Edge Green Chemistry, Individual Subscription, Corporate Subscription or Synapse 1-Week Trial, or log in if you are a member.

Cutting Edge Green Chemistry

In this recorded webinar, Biomimicry 3.8 chemist Mark Dorfman details how innovation inspired by nature can help you gain the performance and sustainability edge in the chemical manufacturing and materials industries through an exploration of the opportunities life-friendly chemistry offers.

Curated by Mark Dorfman

Good things come in nano packages

March 24th, 2017|Categories: Engineering, Materials, Structures|Sectors: , , |

Good things come in nano packages

Scientists at Harvard’s Wyss Institute have revealed deeper secrets about tiny compartments inside bacteria that enable them to manage chemicals and chemical processes while protecting the rest of the organism. These encapsulation systems could inspire more efficient and effective applications in chemical manufacturing, drug delivery, and material science.

Curated by Mark Dorfman

Infographic: Lightweighting Principles Inspired by Nature

March 22nd, 2017|Categories: Engineering, Materials, News, Structures|Sectors: , , |

Infographic: Lightweighting Principles Inspired by Nature

During her recent Synapse webinar, Lightweighting Models Beyond Bones, Janine Benyus reviewed a set of twelve lightweighting principles inspired by the natural world. Now, we’ve turned that into an infographic as a quick and easy reference to how nature uses materials efficiently and creatively without compromising functionality.  Go here to get the free download!

Curated by Erin Rovalo

Nature is Alive with Chemistry

March 10th, 2017|Categories: Life's Principles, Materials, Webinar|Sectors: , , , , |

To access this content, you must purchase Nature is Alive with Chemistry, Individual Subscription, Synapse 1-Week Trial or Corporate Subscription, or log in if you are a member.

Nature is Alive with Chemistry

In this pre-recorded webinar available on demand, Biomimicry 3.8 chemist Mark Dorfman unpacks the complexity of chemical science as he takes us on an illuminating tour of nature’s chemistry-based adaptations, including a deep dive into how we can “use life-friendly chemistry”–one of Life’s Principles that represent the main strategies and deep design lessons Life has evolved over 3.8 billion years in order to survive and thrive.

Curated by Mark Dorfman

Mussels’ ‘waterproof glue’ relies on multi-molecular technology

March 4th, 2017|Categories: Materials, Product Design|Sectors: , , |

Mussels’ ‘waterproof glue’ relies on multi-molecular technology

This valuable Journal of Experimental Biology review paper dives deeper into the biological mechanisms of mussel adhesion under water. There are more than just amino acids involved. The mussel foot also creates an insulated reaction chamber that enables the adhesive proteins to undergo changes that result in forming solid glue.

Robyn-01Curated by Robyn Klein

Seagrasses wave goodbye to pathogens

March 3rd, 2017|Categories: Water, Wellness|Sectors: , , |

Seagrasses wave goodbye to pathogens

Research done off the Indonesian coast suggest that seagrasses reduce the concentration of pathogenic microorganisms in the water column, helping fish and coral reefs thrive, as detailed in this Science magazine article. Whether the seagrass strategy involves chemistry, surface physics, or a surprisingly new mechanism remains to be seen, the potential for new public health approaches in the face of failing antibiotics is exciting.

Mark-01Curated by Mark Dorfman

Oxygen-starved sentiments could help create sustainable industrial processes

February 16th, 2017|Categories: Engineering|Sectors: , , |

Oxygen-starved sentiments could help create sustainable industrial processes

Scientists have discovered a multicellular life form that thrives in the muddy, salty, oxygen-starved sediments at the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea off the coast of Crete, according to this BBC Earth article. The principles underlying the survival strategies used by such organisms in this extreme environment could provide inspiration for effective, innovative, and sustainable solutions to challenges faced under the hazardous conditions of certain industrial processes.

Mark-01Curated by Mark Dorfman

Bacteria hitch on a ride on the fungal highway

February 11th, 2017|Categories: Engineering, Materials, Structures|Sectors: , , |

Bacteria hitch on a ride on the fungal highway

The thin layer of water covering the surface of fungal filaments acts as a high speed rail for bacteria. Vast mycelium networks that knit the roots of different plants together in forest soils allow bacteria to jump the dry gaps, according to this Scientific American article. Where might these principles give rise to new innovations in drug delivery, chemical manufacturing, or perhaps the next generation of computing “hardware”?

Mark-01Curated by Mark Dorfman