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How a spider spins key to fabric breakthroughs

April 13th, 2017|Categories: Additive Manufacturing, Materials, Packaging, Structures|Sectors: |

How a spider spins key to fabric breakthroughs

This bio-assisted, rather than biomimicked technology, is an honorable testament to the amazing qualities of spider silk. Using GMO yeast might help Dan Widmaier of Bolt produce a bio-based fiber, the mesmerizing functions of spider silk lie not in the molecular make-up of the silk, but rather the method of extrusion through spider spinnerets, according to this New Yorker article. Combining the chemistry (achievable without GMOs) with the mechanics is the holy grail for truly emulating the spider’s genius.

Curated by Dayna Baumeister

Innovation Edges in Biomimetic Chemistry

April 11th, 2017|Categories: Infographic, Materials|Sectors: , , , , , , |

Innovation Edges in Biomimetic Chemistry

During his Synapse webinar, Cutting Edge Green Chemistry, Biomimicry 3.8’s Mark Dorfman outlined seven exciting threads of research in bioinspired chemistry that will drive innovations in the chemical and materials manufacturing sectors. Now, we’ve turned that into an infographic as a quick and easy reference to jump start thinking on applying these exciting research findings.

Curated by Mark Dorfman

Cutting Edge Green Chemistry

March 30th, 2017|Categories: Materials, Webinar|Sectors: , , , , , , |

To access this content, you must purchase Cutting Edge Green Chemistry, Individual Subscription, Corporate Subscription or Synapse 1-Week Trial, or log in if you are a member.

Cutting Edge Green Chemistry

In this recorded webinar, Biomimicry 3.8 chemist Mark Dorfman details how innovation inspired by nature can help you gain the performance and sustainability edge in the chemical manufacturing and materials industries through an exploration of the opportunities life-friendly chemistry offers.

Curated by Mark Dorfman

Nature is Alive with Chemistry

March 10th, 2017|Categories: Life's Principles, Materials, Webinar|Sectors: , , , , |

To access this content, you must purchase Nature is Alive with Chemistry, Individual Subscription, Synapse 1-Week Trial or Corporate Subscription, or log in if you are a member.

Nature is Alive with Chemistry

In this pre-recorded webinar available on demand, Biomimicry 3.8 chemist Mark Dorfman unpacks the complexity of chemical science as he takes us on an illuminating tour of nature’s chemistry-based adaptations, including a deep dive into how we can “use life-friendly chemistry”–one of Life’s Principles that represent the main strategies and deep design lessons Life has evolved over 3.8 billion years in order to survive and thrive.

Curated by Mark Dorfman

Lightweighting like nature: A futuristic concept no longer

March 9th, 2017|Categories: Materials, Structures|Sectors: , , |

Lightweighting like nature: A futuristic concept no longer

On the heels of our webinar series on Lightweighting Inspired by Nature with Janine Benyus, Nature Nanotechnology has just published new findings on how we might mimic nature’s ability to build lightweight materials with hierarchical nano-, micro-, and macro-structures that self assemble. Lightweighting like nature is a futuristic concept, but these new findings shed new light on how it will be possible.

Curated by Erin Rovalo

Mussels’ ‘waterproof glue’ relies on multi-molecular technology

March 4th, 2017|Categories: Materials, Product Design|Sectors: , , |

Mussels’ ‘waterproof glue’ relies on multi-molecular technology

This valuable Journal of Experimental Biology review paper dives deeper into the biological mechanisms of mussel adhesion under water. There are more than just amino acids involved. The mussel foot also creates an insulated reaction chamber that enables the adhesive proteins to undergo changes that result in forming solid glue.

Robyn-01Curated by Robyn Klein

Researchers identify missing link in spider silk emulation

February 17th, 2017|Categories: Additive Manufacturing, Materials, Textiles|Sectors: , , , , , , , , , , |

Researchers identify missing link in spider silk emulation

The limitation to emulating the super properties of spider silk for the last decade has not been the chemistry, but rather the method of extrusion. Turns out the amazing dynamics of spider silk rely critically on how the silk itself is spun through the spider’s spinnerets. The technology detailed in this Seeker article will open up possibilities for silk emulation for applications far beyond the suggested nerve repair opportunity.

Dayna-01Curated by Dayna Baumeister

New technology could help us emulate nature’s brilliant shapes

February 4th, 2017|Categories: Additive Manufacturing, Architecture, Carbon, Energy Efficiency, Engineering, Materials, Product Design, Structures, Textiles, Water|Sectors: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

New technology could help us emulate nature’s brilliant shapes

The key to many of nature’s strategies is using shape rather than material. Emulating those shapes, especially at the nano-scale, has proven challenging. This new platform technology has the potential to leverage the shape of nature’s surface textures to add functionality to a wide variety of surfaces by building from the bottom up.

Dayna-01Curated by Dayna Baumeister

How nature achieves energy efficient water desalination without waste

September 17th, 2016|Categories: Water|Sectors: |

How nature achieves energy efficient water desalination without waste

Water desalination processes are becoming controversial due to their high-energy use and the resulting highly concentrated brine waste. For millions of years, microorganisms have filtered salt from water. This comprehensive overview of biodesalination describes the many desalination mechanisms in nature. We stand on the edge of developing new technologies that mimic the mechanisms of living organisms to reduce the costs, increase the efficiency, and make desalination a less harmful process.

Robyn-01Curated by Robyn Klein

Star-nosed mole ‘sees’ through touch

September 10th, 2016|Categories: Engineering|Sectors: , , |

Star-nosed mole ‘sees’ through touch

The snout of the star-nosed mole is made of 22 tentacle-like rays and contains about 30,000 dome-shaped structures that contain nerve endings allowing this functionally blind animal sees through touch, according to AskNature.org. They can even smell underwater by blowing air bubbles onto objects and then sticking their noses in them. Investigating the star-nosed mole could result in new technologies in robotics and sensors.

Robyn-01Curated by Robyn Klein