Filtered By: Dayna Baumeister
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Dayna Baumeister

About Dayna Baumeister

Dr. Dayna Baumeister is the Co-founder of Biomimicry 3.8

How a spider spins key to fabric breakthroughs

April 13th, 2017|Categories: Additive Manufacturing, Materials, Packaging, Structures|Sectors: |

How a spider spins key to fabric breakthroughs

This bio-assisted, rather than biomimicked technology, is an honorable testament to the amazing qualities of spider silk. Using GMO yeast might help Dan Widmaier of Bolt produce a bio-based fiber, the mesmerizing functions of spider silk lie not in the molecular make-up of the silk, but rather the method of extrusion through spider spinnerets, according to this New Yorker article. Combining the chemistry (achievable without GMOs) with the mechanics is the holy grail for truly emulating the spider’s genius.

Curated by Dayna Baumeister

Mimicking tooth enamel to create the next super material

March 17th, 2017|Categories: Engineering, Materials, Resilience|Sectors: , , |

Mimicking tooth enamel to create the next super material

This is a perfect illustration of how abstracting the design principle from tooth enamel can lead to a novel material for plane hulls. Structural materials of most transportation devices have the same functional needs (e.g. strength, manage vibration, crack resistant) as tooth enamel, so abstracting the strategy helped a team at the University of Michigan emulate the tooth’s secret to success. According to this Gizmondo article, they used only using metal and polymer, rather than calcium and protein.

Curated by Dayna Baumeister

Insect wing flexibility principle adds major turbine oomph

March 11th, 2017|Categories: Climate Change, Energy Efficiency, Structures|Sectors: |

Insect wing flexibility principle adds major turbine oomph

Lessons from nature don’t always have to be complex. The simple principle of “add flexibility rather than rigidity” helped researchers at Paris-Sorbonne University demonstrate the potential to yield 35% more power from wind turbines. While the challenge now lies in scaling the prototypes, abstracting the simple design principle opened up new ways of thinking about blades.

Curated by Dayna Baumeister

Honeybee hexagons and the 100x factor

February 24th, 2017|Categories: Engineering, Materials, Structures|Sectors: , , |

Honeybee hexagons and the 100x factor

Even tried and true lessons from nature still yield a myriad of benefits. Ford tapped into the multi-functionality of the hexagons of bees to yield an incredible strength to weight ratio of 100x in the trunk of their Ford EcoSport, according to this Sustainable Brands article. There are hundreds of other lightweighting strategies yet to be tapped into—good news in an era of material frugality.

Dayna-01Curated by Dayna Baumeister

Researchers identify missing link in spider silk emulation

February 17th, 2017|Categories: Additive Manufacturing, Materials, Textiles|Sectors: , , , , , , , , , , |

Researchers identify missing link in spider silk emulation

The limitation to emulating the super properties of spider silk for the last decade has not been the chemistry, but rather the method of extrusion. Turns out the amazing dynamics of spider silk rely critically on how the silk itself is spun through the spider’s spinnerets. The technology detailed in this Seeker article will open up possibilities for silk emulation for applications far beyond the suggested nerve repair opportunity.

Dayna-01Curated by Dayna Baumeister

New technology could help us emulate nature’s brilliant shapes

February 4th, 2017|Categories: Additive Manufacturing, Architecture, Carbon, Energy Efficiency, Engineering, Materials, Product Design, Structures, Textiles, Water|Sectors: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

New technology could help us emulate nature’s brilliant shapes

The key to many of nature’s strategies is using shape rather than material. Emulating those shapes, especially at the nano-scale, has proven challenging. This new platform technology has the potential to leverage the shape of nature’s surface textures to add functionality to a wide variety of surfaces by building from the bottom up.

Dayna-01Curated by Dayna Baumeister

Important evolutionary lessons from giraffe necks

December 3rd, 2016|Categories: Energy Efficiency, Engineering, Materials, Product Design, Resilience, Structures|Sectors: , , , , , |

Important evolutionary lessons from giraffe necks

Giraffes remind us of life’s “evolutionary baggage”—an important awareness in the practice of biomimicry. Nature’s solutions are local optima (not usually global), yet amazingly still offer huge insights into life’s work-arounds. This fascinating Nautilus article offers a plethora of giraffe lessons worth exploring.

Dayna-01Curated by Dayna Baumeister

Inspiration from the blue tarantula could create major sustainability win

November 7th, 2016|Categories: Architecture, Engineering, Materials, Packaging, Product Design, Structures, Textiles|Sectors: , , , , , , , |

Inspiration from the blue tarantula could create major sustainability win

Biomimicry Specialist Bor-Kai Hsiung’s PhD research into a novel form of structural color blue reminds us of how many of life’s secrets there are yet to discover. Bor-Kai came across the oddity of blue spiders and his biomimicry-infused curiosity has led him down a fascinating path of discovery, which you can read more about in this Raw Story article. Unlike many innovations, this one has the potential to leap-frog structural color technologies towards some real sustainable wins.

Dayna-01Curated by Dayna Baumeister

Learning from birds’ songs to adapt to climate change

August 28th, 2016|Categories: Business Models, Climate Change, Organizations, Resilience, Social Innovation, Wellness|Sectors: , , , , , , , |

Learning from birds’ songs to adapt to climate change

We need a plethora of strategies to adapt to climate change. Once again, life surprises us with new innovations. Zebra finches are singing to their eggs and the tune they choose dictates the size of the developing embryo in the egg, according to this Smithsonian Magazine article. Smaller chicks need fewer resources and cool off more easily. How can our warning calls literally result in more adapted future generations?

Dayna-01Curated by Dayna Baumeister

Accidental discovery mimics nature’s water capture systems

June 24th, 2016|Categories: Structures, Water|Sectors: , , , , , , |

Accidental discovery mimics nature’s water capture systems

This accidental discovery is—unbeknownst to the researchers—a biomimetic emulation. Numerous organisms use capillary action to both capture moisture from the air and wick it towards point of use—redwoods, African crested rats, dromedary, Texas horned lizards, and arboreal lichen just to name a few.

Dayna-01Curated by Dayna Baumeister